Loyalty, Research, and Prison Education

I’m in Dallas, Texas for the the National Conference for Higher Education in Prison. Today I’ll be presenting a paper from a larger project on loyalty and social science research methods which draws on an argument I first encountered in Peter Levine’s work. Here’s a link to the PowerPoint of my talk. It is fairly… Continue reading Loyalty, Research, and Prison Education

An Ethical Argument for Philosophy Co-Authorship; on Friendship and Disagreement

This piece was co-written and co-published with Eric Schliesser. The most dazzling example of co-authorship is Paul ErdÅ‘s, who co-wrote more than 1400 papers in mathematics with 485 collaborators. (What is your ErdÅ‘s number?) To do this, he became functionally homeless: “His modus operandi was to show up on the doorstep of a fellow mathematician,… Continue reading An Ethical Argument for Philosophy Co-Authorship; on Friendship and Disagreement

“Expanding College Opportunity in Our Nation’s Prisons”

College in prisons is the easiest and most obvious of a host of criminal justice reforms that we absolutely must be making and for which there is bipartisan support. We incarcerate 2.3 million people in the US, at a rate more than seven times higher than the global average. We’re not seven times more violent or larcenous than the rest of the world–perhaps we are seven times more racist, but even that isn’t clear any longer–so we need to fix this over-incarceration crisis. But for the time being, educating the people we incarcerate is almost literally the least we can do.

Diversify or Die

There’s an interesting piece in the Stone today on the consequences of philosophy’s Anglo-European blinders: If Philosophy Won’t Diversify, Let’s Call It What It Really Is. Garfield and Van Norden suggest that the systematic failure to address non-Western sources impoverishes the discipline and belies any claim to universality. And what a wonderfully provocative list of addenda… Continue reading Diversify or Die