Touchstone Terms: Personality Disorders and Ego-Syntony

I find the distinction between psychological disorders and personality disorders fascinating. Consider obsession and compulsion. Someone suffering from the anxiety disorder OCD will often engage in ritualistic actions: locking and unlocking a door a set number of times, carefully arranging furniture, repetitive washing, or hoarding. A person with the personality disorder OCPD may do some… Continue reading Touchstone Terms: Personality Disorders and Ego-Syntony

In-Groups Defend Their Turf? Philosophy versus Psychology in the New York Times

A showdown of sorts with Jonathan Haidt is brewing on The Stone. Michael P. Lynch gives us “A Vote for Reason.” The judgment that reasons play no role in judgment is itself a judgment. And Haidt has defended it with reasons. So if those reasons convince me that his theory is true, then reasons can play a… Continue reading In-Groups Defend Their Turf? Philosophy versus Psychology in the New York Times

Jonathan Haidt’s Conflation of the Personal and the Partisan

There’s been a conflict running through Jonathan Haidt’s work that it’s time for him to address. On the one hand, he asserts that there are characteristic moral intuitions that distinguish partisan liberals from partisan conservatives. He recently argued that these moral intuitions are demonstrated by the fact that the vast majority of social psychologists identify… Continue reading Jonathan Haidt’s Conflation of the Personal and the Partisan

Bridging The Will-Be/Ought Gap

So I’ve been writing the last few days on a number of only tenuously related themes: cruelty and torture, probability and prediction markets, testability, middle-range theories, and moral realism. Today I’m going to try to draw these themes together and point to a couple avenues for further discussion. Obviously, it’s important to me that our normative… Continue reading Bridging The Will-Be/Ought Gap